Posts

Poster “Testing Challenges for IoT Smart Sensors”

Introduction:

According to many market predictions, the IoT will drive a “third wave” of semiconductor growth to enable over 25 billion sensors by 2020 for end-node applications in multiple market segments [1].  These IoT end nodes are smart, connected ‘things’ that typically consist of 3 key elements: sensors, microcontrollers (including flash memory) and low-power wireless interfaces.

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How Internet of Things will Change Back End Processing

Abstract:

Internet of Things (IoT) is being touted as the next wave that will drive the semiconductor market. Our industry is paving the way to supporting smart cities, home automation, connected vehicles, healthcare/health monitoring and much more.  The evolution to the connected world is changing the way semiconductor manufacturers look at their device manufacturing processes.  Cost pressures, technology integration/packaging, and product mix will directly impact the back end processing of IoT devices.

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“Smart Things” Need Flexible Test

Abstract:

The Internet of Things (IoT) is expected to drive demand for tens of billions of devices by 2020 and these IoT end nodes or “Smart Things” will integrate multiple functions, including sensors, microcontrollers and RF interfaces, each presenting unique test challenges which are continuously evolving.

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Does the Internet of Things force us to rethink our test strategies?

Abstract:

The Internet of Things (IoT) seems to be on a good growth trajectory. Novel sensor devices for the end nodes, combinations thereof are launched every month.

Many sensors – many of them being MEMS based – require a thorough calibration and test prior to being assembled into the end node device. Sensor test typically includes providing a defined stimulus signal – e.g. acceleration, turn, magnetic field, sound, moisture, gas – while the device is being tested not only to validate the device function but also to calibrate its output signals. Providing such a stimulus during test is no minor challenge: consider what can happen to a contacted device under test do when subjected to an acceleration as high as 100g – 10 times that what electronics in a fighter jet are typically exposed to.

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